Reference to the first header of another file:
\x[not-readme]
which renders as:
Reference to a non-first header of another file:
\x[h2-in-not-the-readme]
which renders as:
To make toplevel links cleaner,if target header is the very first element of the other page, then the link does not get a fragment, e.g.: \x[not-readme] rendered as:
<a href="not-readme"
and not:
<a href="not-readme#not-readme"
while \x[h2-in-not-the-readme] is rendered with the fragment:
<a href="not-readme#h2-in-not-the-readme"
Reference to the first header of another file that is a second inclusion:
\x[included-by-not-readme]
which renders as:
Reference to another header of another file, with full:
\x[h2-in-not-the-readme]{full}.
which renders as:
Note that when full is used with references in another file in multi page mode, the number is not rendered as explained at: Section "\x full argument in cross file references".
Reference to an image in another file:
\x[image-not-readme-xi]{full}.
which renders as:
Reference to an image in another file:
\x[image-figure-in-not-the-readme-without-explicit-id]{full}.
which renders as:
Remember that the ID of the toplevel header is automatically derived from its file name, that's why we have to use:
\x[not-readme]
which renders as:
instead of:
\x[not-the-readme]
Reference to a subdirectory:
\x[subdir]

\x[subdir/h2]

\x[subdir/notindex]

\x[subdir/notindex-h2]
which renders as:
Implemented at: github.com/cirosantilli/ourbigbook/issues/116
Reference to an internal header of another file: h2 in not the README. By default, That header ID gets prefixed by the ID of the top header.
When using --embed-includes mode, the cross file references end up pointing to an ID inside the current HTML element, e.g.:
<a href="#not-readme">
rather than:
<a href="not-readme.html/#not-readme">
This is why IDs must be unique for elements across all pages.

Ancestors