Paragraphs are made by simplying adding an empty line, e.g.:
My first paragraph.

And now my second paragraph.

Third one to finish.
which renders as:
My first paragraph.
And now my second paragraph.
Third one to finish.
Headers are created by starting the line with equal signs. The more equal signs the deeper you are, e.g.:
= Animal

== Mammal

=== Dog

=== Cat

== Bird

=== Pigeon

=== Chicken
On OurBigBook Web, the toplevel header of each page goes into a separate title box, so there things would just look like:
  • title box: "Animal"
  • body:
    == Mammal
    
    === Dog
    
    === Cat
    
    == Bird
    
    === Pigeon
    
    === Chicken
You can can use any header as a tag of any other header, e.g.:
= Animal

== Dog
{tag=Cute animal}

== Turtle
{tag=Ugly animal}

== Animal cuteness

=== Cute animal

=== Ugly animal
Headers have several powerful features that you can read more about under \H arguments, e.g. \H synonym argument and \H disambiguate argument.
To link to any of your other pages, you can use angle brackets (less than/greater than) signs:
I have a <cute animal>. <Birds> are too noisy.
Note how capitalization and pluralization generally just work.
To use a custom link text on a reference, use the following syntax:
I have a <cute animal>[furry animal]. <Birds>[feathery animals] are too noisy.
External links can be input directly as:
This is a great website: https://example.com

I really like https://example.com[this website].
which renders as:
This is a great website: example.com
I really like this website.
Code blocks are done with backticks `. With just one backtick, you get a code block inside the text:
The function call `f(x + 1, "abc")` is wrong.
which renders as:
The function call f(x + 1, "abc") is wrong.
and with two ore more backticks you get a code block on its own line, and possibly with multiple code lines:
The function:
``
function f(x, s) {
  return x + s
}
``
is wrong.
which renders as:
The function:
function f(x, s) {
  return x + s
}
is wrong.
Mathematics syntax is very similar to code blocks, you can just enter you LaTeX code in it:
The number $\sqrt{2}$ is irrational.

The same goes for:
$$
\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}
$$
which renders as:
The number is irrational.
The same goes for:
You can refer to specific equations like this:
As shown in <equation Very important equation>, this is true.

$$
\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}
$$
{title=Very important equation}
which renders as:
As shown in Equation 2. "Very important equation", this is true.
Equation 2. Very important equation
Images and videos are easy to add and refer to:
As shown at <image Cute chicken chick>, chicks are cute.

\Image[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/H%C3%BChnerk%C3%BCken_02.jpg/800px-H%C3%BChnerk%C3%BCken_02.jpg?20200716091201]
{title=Cute chicken chick}

\Video[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_fl4xoGTKU]
{title=Top Down 2D Continuous Game by Ciro Santilli (2018)}
which renders as:
As shown at Figure 2. "Cute chicken chick", chicks are cute.
Figure 2. Cute chicken chick. Source.
Video 1. Top Down 2D Continuous Game by Ciro Santilli (2018) Source.
Images can take a bunch of options, about which you can read more about at image arguments. Most should be self explanatory, here is an image with a bunch of useful arguments:
\Image[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/H%C3%BChnerk%C3%BCken_02.jpg/800px-H%C3%BChnerk%C3%BCken_02.jpg?20200716091201]
{title=Ultra cute chicken chick}
{description=
The chicken is yellow, and the hand is brown.

The background is green.
}
{border}
{height=400}
{source=https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:H%C3%BChnerk%C3%BCken_02.jpg}
which renders as:
Figure 3. Ultra cute chicken chick. Source.
The chicken is yellow, and the hand is brown.
The background is green.
Lists are written by starting the line with an asterisk *:
* first item
* second item
* and the third
which renders as:
  • first item
  • second item
  • and the third
A nested list:
* first item
  * first item version 1
  * first item version 2
    * first item version 2 1
    * first item version 2 2
* second item
* and the third
which renders as:
  • first item
    • first item version 1
    • first item version 2
      • first item version 2 1
      • first item version 2 2
  • second item
  • and the third
Lists items can contain any markup, e.g. paragraphs. You just need to keep the same number of spaces, e.g.:
* first item.

  Second paragraph of first item.

  And a third one.
* second item
  * second item v1

    Another paragraph in second item v1
  * second item v2
which renders as:
  • first item.
    Second paragraph of first item.
    And a third one.
  • second item
    • second item v1
      Another paragraph in second item v1
    • second item v2
Tables are not very different from lists. We use double pipes for headers ||, and a single pipe | for regular rows:
|| City
|| Sales

| Salt Lake City
| 124,00

| New York
| 1,000,000
which renders as:
City Sales
Salt Lake City 124,00
New York 1,000,000
To add a title we need to use an explicit \Table macro as in:
See <table Sales per city> for more information.

\Table
{title=Sales per city}
[
|| City
|| Sales

| Salt Lake City
| 124,00

| New York
| 1,000,000
]
which renders as:
See Table 1. "Sales per city" for more information.
Table 1. Sales per city.
City Sales
Salt Lake City 124,00
New York 1,000,000

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